Housing History Day (Edinburgh)

On the 24th October 2016, Tower Block is running a free research day at Historic Environment Scotland in Edinburgh. Led by Diane Watters and Dawn Ewers, a series of workshops will provide an introduction to the collections in the archive, and guidance on how to research the history of buildings in Scotland, with a focus on local history and housing.

This will be followed by a social history walk in Wester Hailes, led by Eoghan Howard, one of the partners of the Our Place in Time project, and a Wester Hailes resident. The walk will focus on the history of Wester Hailes, postwar housing, and the archive of the ‘Sentinel’ community newspaper, which ran in the area in the 1980s and 1990s.

The day as a whole will give an overview of the national and local history of postwar housing, and provide the tools with which to do further research.

Free transport is provided between HES and Wester Hailes, and lunch will available on the day.

There are a limited number of places for this research day, so please book through the event page here –

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Cumbernauld Exhibition

On the 24th September 2016, Tower Block will be putting on a free exhibition about the social and architectural history of Cumbernauld in Cumbernauld Community Enterprise Centre, G67 1AA (12 – 4pm).

Cumbernauld resident Jean O’Reilly will also be running guided local history walks from the exhibition.These will run at 12:30 (for 2 hours) and 3:30pm (for 1 hour), and give an insight in to the history of Cumbernauld’s development and social history over the second half of the twentieth century.

We’re also asking Cumbernauld residents to bring their own photos of the town along to the exhibition to share. The Scotland’s Urban Past team will be there on the 24th to scan these photos in to Historic Environment Scotland’s official record of the built environment (Canmore).

The exhibition itself will look at Cumbernauld from it’s inception, as the result of mass overcrowding in Glasgow, and the vision of Cumbernauld as a New Town and a site of opportunity for residents and businesses alike. Using photographs, advertising material, letters and plans from the 1950s through to the 1990s, visitors can explore the ways in which the town was envisioned and run by the Cumbernauld Development Corporation, as well as shaped and experienced by those who made the move there.The exhibition will pay special attention to the work of Brian Miller, Cumbernauld’s town artist from 1962, and the public art which he created, much of which has now disappeared.